3 Solutions to 2018 Oracle SQL Puzzle of the Week #15

800 Phone Puzzle

For a given 800 phone number (like 1-800-123-4567) find all number-letter representations.

  • Use a single SELECT statement only.
  • Only last 4 digits of the phone number have to be replaced with letters.
  • Exactly 1 letter (out of 4) must be vowel,  the rest – consonant
  • The following table shows all possible mappings:
Digit Maps to
1 1
2 A, B, C
3 D, E, F
4 G, H, I
5 J, K, L
6 M, N, O
7 P, Q, R, S
8 T, U, V
9 W, X, Y, Z
0 0

Solutions:

Essentially, all solutions below share the same idea of generating the letter based phone numbers. The differences are in a way the mapping CTE is created and a way to limit the number of vowels to 1.

Solution #1. Compact form of creating the map CTE with recursive check for the vowels:

WITH map AS (
SELECT digit, letter, '4357' phone
FROM TABLE(sys.odcivarchar2list('00','11','2ABC','3DEF','4GHI',
                                '5JKL','6MNO','7PQRS','8TUV','9WXYZ')) t,
 LATERAL(SELECT SUBSTR(t.column_value,1,1) digit, 
                SUBSTR(t.column_value,1+LEVEL,1) letter
         FROM dual
         CONNECT BY SUBSTR(t.column_value,1+LEVEL,1) IS NOT NULL) x
), res(str, lvl, phone,has_vowel) AS ( 
SELECT letter, 1, phone, 
 CASE WHEN letter IN ('A','E','I','O','U') THEN 1 ELSE 0 END
FROM map 
WHERE SUBSTR(phone,1,1)=TO_CHAR(map.digit) 
UNION ALL 
SELECT res.str || letter, res.lvl+1, res.phone,
       CASE WHEN letter IN ('A','E','I','O','U') 
               OR res.has_vowel=1 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END
FROM res JOIN map ON SUBSTR(res.phone, res.lvl+1,1)=TO_CHAR(map.digit) 
WHERE res.lvl+1<=LENGTH(res.phone) 
  AND NOT (letter IN ('A','E','I','O','U') AND res.has_vowel=1)
) 
SELECT '1-800-123-' || str phone 
FROM res
WHERE lvl=LENGTH(phone)
  AND has_vowel=1

Solution #2. Using more efficient way of creating the map CTE :

WITH x AS (
SELECT ROWNUM-1 digit,COLUMN_VALUE letters
FROM TABLE(sys.odcivarchar2list('0','1','ABC','DEF','GHI','JKL',
                                'MNO','PQRS','TUV','WXYZ'))
), map AS (
SELECT digit, SUBSTR(letters, level, 1) letter, '4357' phone
FROM x
CONNECT BY SUBSTR(letters, level, 1) IS NOT NULL
       AND PRIOR digit = digit 
       AND PRIOR DBMS_RANDOM.VALUE IS NOT NULL
), res(str, lvl, phone,has_vowel) AS ( 
SELECT letter, 1, phone, 
       CASE WHEN letter IN ('A','E','I','O','U') THEN 1 ELSE 0 END
FROM map 
WHERE SUBSTR(phone,1,1)=TO_CHAR(map.digit) 
UNION ALL 
SELECT res.str || letter, res.lvl+1, res.phone,
       CASE WHEN letter IN ('A','E','I','O','U') 
              OR res.has_vowel=1 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END
FROM res JOIN map ON SUBSTR(res.phone, res.lvl+1,1)=TO_CHAR(map.digit) 
WHERE res.lvl+1<=LENGTH(res.phone) 
  AND NOT (letter IN ('A','E','I','O','U') AND res.has_vowel=1)
) 
SELECT '1-800-123-' || str phone 
FROM res
WHERE lvl=LENGTH(phone)
 AND has_vowel=1

Solution #3. Much more efficient way of creating the map CTE and using Regular Expression to limit the vowels :

WITH d AS ( 
SELECT LEVEL+1 n, CASE WHEN LEVEL+1 IN (7,9) THEN 4 ELSE 3 END cnt,
       '4357' phone
FROM dual 
CONNECT BY LEVEL<=8 
), a AS ( 
SELECT CHR(ASCII('A')+LEVEL-1) letter, ROWNUM rn 
FROM dual 
CONNECT BY CHR(ASCII('A')+LEVEL-1)<='Z' 
), x AS ( 
SELECT n, 
       1+NVL(SUM(cnt) OVER(ORDER BY n ROWS BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING 
                                           AND 1 PRECEDING),0) c1, 
       SUM(cnt) OVER(ORDER BY n) c2,
       phone
FROM d 
), map AS ( 
SELECT n digit, letter, x.phone
FROM x JOIN a ON a.rn BETWEEN x.c1 AND x.c2 
UNION 
SELECT ROWNUM-1, TO_CHAR(ROWNUM-1), x.phone
FROM x
WHERE ROWNUM<=2
), res(str, lvl) AS ( 
SELECT letter, 1 
FROM map 
WHERE SUBSTR(map.phone,1,1)=TO_CHAR(map.digit) 
UNION ALL 
SELECT res.str || letter, res.lvl+1
FROM res JOIN map ON SUBSTR(map.phone, res.lvl+1,1)=TO_CHAR(map.digit) 
WHERE res.lvl+1<=LENGTH(map.phone) 
 AND REGEXP_COUNT(res.str || letter,'[AEIOU]')<=1
) 
SELECT str phone 
FROM res 
WHERE lvl=4
 AND REGEXP_COUNT(str,'[AEIOU]')=1

You can execute the above SQL statements in Oracle Live SQL environment.
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3 Solutions to 2018 Oracle SQL Puzzle of the Week #14

Yet Another Top Employee Puzzle

Find the employee who remained the top paid employee (excluding the president) the longest period of time between 1980 and 1981

  • Use a single SELECT statement only.
  • President should be excluded from the analysis.
  • Show the number of days the employee remained the top paid person as well as Start Date (hiredate) and End Date (the date when another top employee started)
  • The End Date for the last top paid employee in the interval should be 31-DEC-1981.

Expected Result:

EMPNO ENAME JOB SAL Start Date End Date Days on Top
7566 JONES MANAGER 2975 02-APR-81 03-DEC-81 245

Solutions:

Solution #1. Using RANK to filter the top employee:

WITH x AS ( 
SELECT empno, ename, job, sal, hiredate, 
       MAX(sal)OVER(ORDER BY hiredate) max_sal 
FROM scott.emp  
WHERE job!='PRESIDENT' 
), y AS ( 
SELECT empno, ename, job, sal, hiredate start_date, max_sal,  
       LEAD(hiredate) OVER(ORDER BY hiredate) end_date 
FROM x 
WHERE sal=max_sal 
), z AS ( 
SELECT y.*, LEAST(end_date, date'1981-12-31')-start_date days_on_top, 
RANK()OVER(ORDER BY LEAST(end_date, date'1981-12-31')-start_date DESC) rk 
FROM y 
WHERE EXTRACT(YEAR FROM start_date) IN (1980, 1981)  
) 
SELECT empno,ename,job,sal, start_date "Start Date", 
       end_date "End Date", days_on_top	"Days on Top" 
FROM z 
WHERE rk=1

Solution #2. Using Subquery to filter the top employee:

WITH x AS ( 
SELECT empno, ename, job, sal, hiredate, 
       MAX(sal)OVER(ORDER BY hiredate) max_sal 
FROM scott.emp  
WHERE job!='PRESIDENT' 
  AND hiredate>=date'1980-01-01'  
), y AS ( 
SELECT empno, ename, job, sal, hiredate start_date,  
       LEAST(date'1981-12-31', 
             LEAD(hiredate) OVER(ORDER BY hiredate)) end_date 
FROM x 
WHERE sal=max_sal 
) 
SELECT empno,ename,job,sal, start_date "Start Date", 
       end_date "End Date", end_date-start_date "Days on Top" 
FROM y 
WHERE end_date-start_date=(SELECT MAX(end_date-start_date) FROM y)

Solution #3. Using MODEL with RETURN UPDATED ROWS to filter the top employee:

WITH e AS ( 
SELECT empno, ename, sal, job, LEAST(hiredate, date'1981-12-31') hiredate,  
       MAX(sal)OVER(ORDER BY hiredate) max_sal 
FROM scott.emp 
WHERE hiredate>=date'1980-01-01'  
  AND job!='PRESIDENT' 
), x AS ( 
SELECT empno, ename, job, sal, hiredate,  
       NVL(LEAD(hiredate)OVER(ORDER BY hiredate),
           date'1981-12-31')-hiredate diff, 
       NVL(LEAD(hiredate)OVER(ORDER BY hiredate),
           date'1981-12-31') end_date 
FROM e 
WHERE sal=max_sal 
) 
SELECT empno, ename, job, sal, hiredate "Start Date", 
       end_date "End Date", diff "Days on Top" 
FROM x 
MODEL RETURN UPDATED ROWS 
DIMENSION BY (empno, RANK()OVER(ORDER BY diff DESC) rk) 
MEASURES(ename,job,sal, hiredate, end_date, diff, 0 dummy) 
RULES(dummy[ANY, 1]=1)

The following query will only work as long as there is only 1 top paid employee who stayed on top the longest. In case if we had more than 1 it would only list one of those:

WITH x AS (
SELECT empno, ename, job, sal, hiredate, 
       MAX(sal)OVER(ORDER BY hiredate) max_sal
FROM scott.emp 
WHERE job!='PRESIDENT'
), y AS (
SELECT empno, ename, job, sal, hiredate start_date, 
 LEAST(date'1981-12-31', 
       LEAD(hiredate) OVER(ORDER BY hiredate)) end_date,
 LEAST(date'1981-12-31', 
       LEAD(hiredate) OVER(ORDER BY hiredate))-hiredate days_top
FROM x
WHERE sal=max_sal
ORDER BY days_top DESC NULLS LAST, hiredate
)
SELECT *
FROM y
WHERE ROWNUM=1

You can execute the above SQL statements in Oracle Live SQL environment.
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7 Solutions to 2018 Oracle SQL Puzzle of the Week #13

Second Top Employee as of the Start of Employment

List all employees who were 2nd top paid in the entire company as of the time their employment started

  • Use a single SELECT statement only.
  • At the time of employment start the rank of the employee by salary should be 2.
  • Show the top salary at the time when the employee started with the company.
  • We assume that no employees have ever been terminated since day 1.

Expected Result:

ENAME JOB SAL HIREDATE MAX_SAL
WARD SALESMAN 1250 22-FEB-81 1600
BLAKE MANAGER 2850 01-MAY-81 2975
FORD ANALYST 3000 03-DEC-81 5000
SCOTT ANALYST 3000 19-APR-87 5000

Solutions:

Solution #1. Using LATERAL view, RANK and cumulative MAX analytic functions (Oracle 12g+):

SELECT e.ename, e.job, e.hiredate, e.sal, r.max_sal 
FROM scott.emp e, LATERAL(SELECT a.empno,  
                                 RANK() OVER(ORDER BY a.sal DESC) rk, 
                                 MAX(a.sal) OVER() max_sal 
                          FROM scott.emp a 
                          WHERE a.hiredate<=e.hiredate) r 
WHERE e.empno=r.empno  
  AND rk=2 
ORDER BY e.hiredate

Solution #2. Using CTE, cumulative MAX analytic function and a correlated subquery with COUNT to mimic the filter by RANK:

WITH x AS ( 
SELECT ename, job, hiredate, sal, MAX(sal)OVER(ORDER BY hiredate) max_sal 
FROM scott.emp a 
) 
SELECT * 
FROM x 
WHERE 1=(SELECT COUNT(*) 
         FROM scott.emp 
         WHERE hiredate<=x.hiredate 
           AND sal>x.sal) 
ORDER BY hiredate

Solution #3. Using CTE, cumulative MAX analytic function and an in-line scalar subquery in SELECT to mimic the RANK:

WITH x AS ( 
SELECT ename, job, hiredate, sal, MAX(sal)OVER(ORDER BY hiredate) max_sal, 
       (SELECT COUNT(*)+1 
        FROM scott.emp 
        WHERE sal>e.sal  
          AND hiredate<=e.hiredate) rk 
FROM scott.emp e 
) 
SELECT ename, job, hiredate, sal, max_sal 
FROM x 
WHERE rk=2 
ORDER BY hiredate

Solution #4. Using self-join and Cartesian Product with aggregation:

SELECT a.ename, a.job, a.hiredate, a.sal, MAX(b.sal) max_sal 
FROM scott.emp a JOIN scott.emp b ON b.hiredate<=a.hiredate 
                                 AND b.sal>a.sal 
GROUP BY a.ename, a.job, a.hiredate, a.sal 
HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT b.empno)=1 
ORDER BY a.hiredate

Solution #5. Using CTE and cumulative MAX analytic function (twice):

WITH x AS ( 
SELECT ename, job, hiredate, sal, 
       MAX(sal) OVER(ORDER BY hiredate) max_sal 
FROM scott.emp  
), y  AS ( 
SELECT ename, job, hiredate, sal, max_sal, MAX(sal) OVER(ORDER BY hiredate) max_sal2 
FROM x 
WHERE sal<max_sal 
) 
SELECT ename, job, hiredate, sal, max_sal 
FROM y 
WHERE sal=max_sal2 
ORDER BY hiredate

Solution #6. Using regular and recursive CTEs, ROWNUM, GREATEST, and CASE functions (no Analytic functions!):

WITH e AS ( 
SELECT ename, job, sal, hiredate 
FROM scott.emp 
ORDER BY hiredate 
), x AS ( 
SELECT ename, job, sal, hiredate, ROWNUM rn 
FROM e 
), y(max_sal, sal2, rn) AS ( 
SELECT sal, 0, 1 
FROM x 
WHERE rn=1 
UNION ALL 
SELECT GREATEST(x.sal, y.max_sal) AS max_sal, 
       CASE WHEN x.sal>y.max_sal THEN y.max_sal 
            WHEN x.sal>y.sal2 AND x.sal<=y.max_sal THEN x.sal  
            ELSE y.sal2  
       END AS sal2, 
       x.rn 
FROM x JOIN y ON x.rn=y.rn+1 
) 
SELECT x.ename, x.job, x.sal, x.hiredate, y.max_sal 
FROM y JOIN x ON y.rn=x.rn AND y.sal2=x.sal

Solution #7. Using CTE and MODEL clause to mimic Solution #6:

WITH x AS ( 
SELECT * 
FROM scott.emp 
MODEL 
DIMENSION BY (ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY hiredate) rn) 
MEASURES(ename, job, sal, hiredate, sal max_sal, 0 sal2) 
RULES( 
    max_sal[rn>1] = GREATEST(max_sal[CV()-1], sal[CV()]), 
    sal2[rn>1] = CASE WHEN sal[CV()]> max_sal[CV()-1] THEN max_sal[CV()-1] 
                      WHEN sal[CV()]> sal2[CV()-1]   
		       AND sal[CV()]<=max_sal[CV()-1] THEN sal[CV()]  
                      ELSE sal2[CV()-1] 
                 END 
     ) 
) 
SELECT ename, job, sal, hiredate, max_sal 
FROM x 
WHERE sal=sal2

You can execute the above SQL statements in Oracle Live SQL environment.
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Further Reading:

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3 Solutions to Puzzle of the Week #20

Puzzle of the Week #20:

Produce the historical highest/lowest salary report that should comply with the following requirements:

  • Use Single SELECT statement only
  • Only employees who was paid the highest or lowest salary in their respective department at the moment of hiring should be selected
  • Show name, date of hire, department number, job title, salary table (emp) columns and two additional calculated columns/flags: min_flag and max_flag to indicate that the employee was hired with the min/max salary in their respective department as of the time of hiring.
  • If two or more employees in the same department are paid the same max/min salary, only the one who was hired first should be picked for the report.
  • The query should work in Oracle 11g.

Expected Result:

POW20ER

#1. Using Common Table Expression (CTE) or Recursive WITH clause

WITH y AS (
SELECT ename, job, deptno, hiredate, sal, 
       ROW_NUMBER()OVER(PARTITION BY deptno ORDER BY hiredate) rn
FROM emp
), x (ename, job, deptno, hiredate, sal, min_sal, max_sal, min_flag, max_flag, rn) AS (
SELECT ename, job, deptno, hiredate, sal, sal, sal, 1, 1, 1
FROM y
WHERE rn=1
UNION ALL
SELECT y.ename, y.job, y.deptno, y.hiredate, y.sal, 
       LEAST(x.min_sal, y.sal), GREATEST(x.max_sal, y.sal),
       CASE WHEN y.sal<x.min_sal THEN 1 END, 
       CASE WHEN y.sal>x.max_sal THEN 1 END, y.rn
FROM y JOIN x ON y.deptno=x.deptno AND y.rn=x.rn+1
)
SELECT ename, job, deptno, hiredate, sal, min_flag, max_flag
FROM x
WHERE 1 IN (min_flag, max_flag)
ORDER BY deptno, hiredate;

#2. Using Cumulative Analytic Functions MIN, MAX, and ROW_NUMBER

WITH x AS (
SELECT ename, job, deptno, hiredate, sal,
       MIN(sal)OVER(PARTITION BY deptno ORDER BY hiredate) min_sal,
       MAX(sal)OVER(PARTITION BY deptno ORDER BY hiredate) max_sal,
       ROW_NUMBER()OVER(PARTITION BY deptno, sal ORDER BY hiredate) rn
FROM emp
)
SELECT ename, job, deptno, hiredate, sal,
       DECODE(sal, min_sal, 1) min_flag,
       DECODE(sal, max_sal, 1) max_flag
FROM x
WHERE sal IN (min_sal, max_sal)
  AND rn=1;

#3. Using Cumulative Analytic Functions MIN, MAX, and COUNT

WITH x AS (
SELECT ename, job, deptno, hiredate, sal,
       CASE WHEN MIN(sal)OVER(PARTITION BY deptno ORDER BY hiredate)=sal
             AND COUNT(*)OVER(PARTITION BY deptno, sal ORDER BY hiredate)=1 THEN 1 
       END min_flag,
       CASE WHEN MAX(sal)OVER(PARTITION BY deptno ORDER BY hiredate)=sal
             AND COUNT(*)OVER(PARTITION BY deptno, sal ORDER BY hiredate)=1 THEN 1 
       END max_flag
FROM emp
)
SELECT *
FROM x
WHERE 1 IN (min_flag, max_flag);

My Oracle Group on Facebook:

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Would you like to read about many more tricks and puzzles?

For more tricks and cool techniques check my book “Oracle SQL Tricks and Workarounds” for instructions.